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FOR SUNDAY

What good can come out of Pcim, Cycow, or Pultusk? No, today's topic isn't about misleading stereotypes or the village head from Wachock. Today, we'll reflect on a passage that helps us understand that even from the most mundane corner of the Near East, something good can emerge. Haven't we all asked ourselves, "Can anything good come out of my life?" Can our "Nazareth" of daily routines, problems, and seemingly trivial decisions give rise to something great?


“The next day Jesus decided to leave for Galilee. Finding Philip, he said to him, “Follow me.” Philip, like Andrew and Peter, was from the town of Bethsaida. Philip found Nathanael and told him, “We have found the one Moses wrote about in the Law, and about whom the prophets also wrote—Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.” “Nazareth! Can anything good come from there?” Nathanael asked. “Come and see,” said Philip. When Jesus saw Nathanael approaching, he said of him, “Here truly is an Israelite in whom there is no deceit.” “How do you know me?” Nathanael asked. Jesus answered, “I saw you while you were still under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Then Nathanael declared, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the king of Israel.” Jesus said, “You believe because I told you I saw you under the fig tree. You will see greater things than that.” He then added, “Very truly I tell you, you will see ‘heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending on’ the Son of Man.””

 

JOHN 1, 43-51 (NIV)

 

What good can come out of Pcim, Cycow, or Pultusk? No, today's topic isn't about misleading stereotypes or the village head from Wachock. Today, we'll reflect on a passage that helps us understand that even from the most mundane corner of the Near East, something good can emerge. Haven't we all asked ourselves, "Can anything good come out of my life?" Can our "Nazareth" of daily routines, problems, and seemingly trivial decisions give rise to something great?


When Nathanael heard about Jesus of Nazareth, he didn't hide his astonishment. "Can anything good come from Nazareth???" he asked with a clear dose of skepticism. How often have we, looking at our own origins, our town, or even our lives, asked ourselves the same question? How many times have we looked at a neighbor, a work colleague, or even a family member and harbored a similar doubt: "Can anything good come out of them?"


But before we succumb to pessimism, let's delve deeper into our text. What does Philip do when Nathanael expresses doubt? Does he engage in debate? Does he try to persuade with arguments? No. He simply says, "Come and see." It's an invitation to personal experience, to an encounter that has the power to change the heart and mind.


Similarly, we are invited not just to hear about God, not only to discuss Him, but to experience Him. Jesus doesn't say, "Believe, because you should." He says, "Come and see." And what do we see when we come? We see Nathanael's disbelief turn into faith. What seemed small and insignificant – Nazareth and a fisherman, a simple man – becomes the site of an encounter with the Son of God. Such an encounter changes everything.


 Let's ask ourselves, are we a bit like Nathanael??? We have our "Nazareths" – areas of life we think nothing good can come from. But can't we respond to Jesus's invitation today and just come and see? Because you know what? Perhaps the greatest good will come from our "Nazareth"??? Maybe it's in our "Nazareth" where we'll meet Jesus. So, let's not be afraid to accept His invitation. Let's not fear discovering that every place, even the most unassuming, can become a place of miracles.


And remember, the next time you hear the question, "Can anything good come from Nazareth," remember Nathanael, who discovered that from Nazareth came the King of Israel. And from our lives? Who knows what good can emerge from ours, if we only give Jesus a chance to surprise us, to lead us, especially when we close our eyes to adversity.

 

May our faith never cease in questioning, in seeking, in journeying towards Jesus, who is already waiting for us, ready to make our "little homelands" a place of His presence, Amen.


 

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